Your guide to Mersea Island
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What to do in Mersea

Mersea Island is the most easterly inhabited island in the UK, situated off the coast of Essex and 9 miles southeast of Colchester.

There are an abundance of things to do on Mersea Island and with the island covering approximately 7 square miles, you will never be bored by the beautiful scenery that awaits you.

 

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England Coast Path – Mersea Island Report by Natural England

England Coast Path – Mersea Island Report by Natural England

England Coast Path – proposals published for second stretch in Essex Report proposes improved public access to more of the Essex coast. The 13 mile route stretches around the coast of Mersea Island, Essex. Objections or representations invited during the next 8 weeks. Natural England ...

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Oysterman digs up a Bronze Age timber track

Oysterman digs up a Bronze Age timber track

An oyster fisherman is thought to have stumbled across a 4,000-year-old track once used by the Bronze Age elite of Essex to expand their settlements. Daniel French discovered the wooden planks almost half a mile offshore from Mersea Island as he was harvesting the shellfish. His discovery last mon...

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Do you believe in ghosts?  Have you heard about the Roman Soldier who walks the Strood?

Do you believe in ghosts? Have you heard about the Roman Soldier who walks the Strood?

During the Roman times, Mersea Island was a Roman outpost and wasn't too far away from the extremely important Roman settlement of Colchester, Essex. Quite possibly the oldest ghost seen in the UK is the apparition of a Roman Soldier which has been seen crossing the Strood, the ancient causeway whi...

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Ray Island & Mysterious Tales!

Ray Island & Mysterious Tales!

Ray Island lies to the right of the Strood as you come across onto the island. The large sandy mound rising out of the surrounding saltings is owned by the National Trust who brought the land in 1970. According to volunteer warden David Nicholls, the National Trust brought it for three main reasons...

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